Facts

These statistics and facts have been acquired through researching various resources across the Internet including the ONS (Office for National Statistics)

  • Overall, 30.0% of women and 16.3% of men had experienced any domestic abuse since the age of 16, equivalent to an estimated 4.9 million female victims of domestic abuse and 2.7 million male victims.
  • The decline in domestic abuse between the 2004/05 and 2012/13 CSEW surveys was statistically significant. However, the current figure (5.7%) continues a fairly stable trend seen since 2008/09.
  • In the last year, partner abuse (non-sexual) and stalking were the most common of the separate types of intimate violence: 4.0% of women and 2.8% of men reported having experienced partner abuse (non-sexual); 4.1% of women and 1.9% of men reported having experienced stalking.
  • Two per cent of women and 0.5% of men had experienced some form of sexual assault (including attempts) in the last year.
  • The CSEW 2012/13 found that, overall, 30.0% of women and 16.3% of men had experienced any domestic abuse since the age of 16. These figures were equivalent to an estimated 4.9 million female victims of domestic abuse and 2.7 million male victims.
  • There were 7.1% of women and 4.4% of men who reported having experienced any type of domestic abuse in the last year, equivalent to an estimated 1.2 million female victims of domestic abuse and 700,000 male victims.
  • Out of the separate types of intimate violence categories, family abuse (non-sexual) had the lowest difference between the prevalence experienced by men compared with women (1.5% and 2.2% respectively). This is still a statistically significant difference.
  • Younger men were also more likely to have experienced domestic abuse than older men. Men aged between 16 and 19 (7.5%) and between 20 and 24 (6.9%) were more likely than men aged between 45 and 54 (3.4%) and between 55 and 59 (2.4%) to have experienced domestic abuse in the last year
  • Both women and men with a long-term illness or disability were more likely to be victims of any domestic abuse in the last year (11.3% and 7.0% respectively), compared with those without a long-term illness or disability (6.3% and 4.0%).
  • Male partner abuse victims were also more likely to experience non-physical abuse (56%) than severe force (34%), minor force (20%) or threats (8%)
  • For both male and female victims, the category most likely to be reported was ‘mental or emotional problems’ (32% of male victims and 45% of female victims) followed by ‘stopped trusting people or difficulty in other relationships’ (14% of male and 23% of female victims).
  • Around three times as many adults aged between 16 and 59 who had taken illicit drugs in the last year reported being a victim of partner abuse compared with those who hadn’t taken drugs in the last year  (11% compared with 3%).
  • Around a quarter (24%) of partner abuse victims that reported abuse in the last year stated that they currently shared, or had previously shared, accommodation with their abusive partner. Of these victims 35% reported leaving the accommodation because of the abuse, even if it was for only one night. This was not statistically different between female and male victims. Of those who left the shared accommodation, 60% spent their first night with relatives, while staying with friends or neighbours was the next most likely destination (20%).
  • Reasons mentioned most frequently for not leaving the shared accommodation were ‘love or feelings for partner’ (53%), ‘presence of children’ (43%) and ‘never considered leaving’ (36%)
  • The percentage of gay or bi-sexual men (6.2%) who suffered partner abuse in 2008/09 is nearly double the number for heterosexual men (3.3%). Lesbian women (12.4%) as a percentage also suffered far more partner abuse compared to heterosexual women (4.3%).
  • In 2012/13, 75,000 men suffered a sexual assault.
  • Male victims (29%) are nearly twice as likely than women (17%) to not tell anyone about the partner abuse.
  • Of those that suffered partner abuse in 2012/13, more men suffered from severe force (34%) than women (28%)
  • In 2012/13, 5.2% of women (845,000) and 3.1% of men (517,000) experienced partner abuse: for every three victims of partner abuse, two will be female and one will be male.
  • More than 40 percent of surveyed LGBT college students (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning and other non-heterosexual identities) have been victims of abuse in current relationships.
  • Domestic violence in the UK is estimated to cost victims, services and the state a total of around £23 billion a year.
  • 49% of gay and bisexual men have experienced at least one incident of domestic abuse from a family member or partner since the age of 16, compared to 17% of men in general.
  • 37% of gay and bisexual men have experienced at least one incident of domestic abuse in a relationship with a man.
  • 23% of gay and bisexual men have experienced domestic abuse from a family member since the age of 16.
  • 78% of gay and bisexual men who have experienced domestic abuse have never reported incidents to the police. Of those who did report it, 53% were not happy with how the police dealt with the situation.
  • 12 organisations offer refuge or safe house provision for male victims in the UK – a total of 86 spaces. There are over 260 organisations with around 4,000 spaces dedicated to female victims

 

Bibliography

Office for National Statistics: Focus on Violent Crime and Sexual Offences 2012/2013
Chapter 4: Intimate Personal Violence and Partner Abuse
M
ankind Initiative: 25 Key Facts About Domestic Abuse
The New Hampshire: Carsey Study reveals concerning percentages of LGBT domestic abuse
White Ribbon Campaign
Gay Activist

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